Internet Service in a 3rd World Country

Living outside the US, in most countries I dare say, you are constantly reminded that “we’re not in Kansas anymore”.

The residence we recently left, because it was somewhat remote, had a choice of but one provider for internet service. It was mostly good, relatively speaking, but a single megabit per second of service cost $85/month. Two Mbps cost $150. We were eagerly anticipating the new residence in Volcan where the landlord had a different provider. He was paying less than $20 for a screaming 3Mbps!

After we moved in we were disappointed to find the differences between the two were not that dramatic, in spite of online testing services verifying the speeds. Twice I called the provider to order a faster speed that I knew they offered, and twice I was told someone would call me back. No one ever did.

We heard about a new service in town. Fiber optic instead of phone line. Yes, phone lines are still used by some ISPs. But probably not in the US. It took the intercession of a neighbor to actually get someone to talk to us about ordering the service. Nice enough young man. He wrote us up on a Thursday and said the installation should take place on the next Monday or Tuesday. It was Tuesday of the following week when it actually happened.

Tapping in to the main fiber optic line.

Tapping in to the main fiber optic line.

Stringing the cable from the road to the house.

Stringing the cable from the road to the house.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had been told that when one ISP is installed over an existing service, the new one likes to disconnect, or pull out, the older one. We were not about to let that happen. At least not until the newer service had proved itself. As it turned out, they never even tried to disconnect the existing ISP.

There were a few false starts over several hours but eventually the new service was working to my satisfaction. Time will tell if it lasts.

 

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